• The Diaspora World Cup operates in some of the major cities and metro areas in United States and Canada. Our network of register players includes 20 cities, 200 countries, 400 teams, and 10,000 players. Join our movement to solve the world's most pressing challenges: Illiteracy
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  • Education is a basic Human Right and the Diaspora World Cup global school program focuses its energy in some the poorest countries around the world. We build schools in some of the poorest countries around the worldthat historically had no adequate school structure. Any member of the World Diaspora has the power to end illiteracy around the world through the power of soccer.
  • High-profile sport figures, global leaders, business leaders, political figure, journalists, activists, philanthropists, actors, and entrepreneurs united by their commitment to the Diaspora World Cup mission to eradicate illiteracy around the world through the power of soccer. They serve as role models and spread the Diaspora World Cup vision and commitment of a world mobilized through soccer.
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Boston – Cambridge





To tell the history of soccer in Boston is mostly to tell the history of soccer in nearby cities and towns. Owing to a lack of available land, among other matters, the city has struggled to provide a suitable home for the beautiful game. The good news is that soccer’s fortune has been inextricably linked to the arrival of immigrants and member of the world’s diaspora in the greater Boston especially, since the very beginning.






The U.S. might still be looking for a top-tier soccer league if not for the 1994 World Cup. It is not an understatement to say that American soccer changed forever that summer. Foxboro Stadium played host to six of the 52 games. Average attendance was 54,022, which exceeded the stadium’s capacity for soccer. The stadium was the site of eventual runners-up Italy’s games in the round of 16 and the quarterfinals. And another World Cup is coming back to the Greater Boston. We are talking about the Diaspora World Cup. The Diaspora World Cup is a global organization committed to eradicate illiteracy in the world through the Power of Soccer. Many members of the Diaspora are participating as a player, a coach or a volunteer.

The Destination
Boston played a crucial role in the birth of the American nation. The city’s rich history and bountiful historic landmarks exist alongside bold skyscrapers indicative of its modern commercial success. This waterfront, also known as America’s Working City and America’s College town is easy to explore by foot. It’s the site of the first major battle of the Revolutionary War in 1775. The official stadium of the MLS New England Revolution is also the site of the hottest concerts, from rock and pop to country.



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