• The Diaspora World Cup operates in some of the major cities and metro areas in United States and Canada. Our network of register players includes 20 cities, 200 countries, 400 teams, and 10,000 players. Join our movement to solve the world's most pressing challenges: Illiteracy
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  • Education is a basic Human Right and the Diaspora World Cup global school program focuses its energy in some the poorest countries around the world. We build schools in some of the poorest countries around the worldthat historically had no adequate school structure. Any member of the World Diaspora has the power to end illiteracy around the world through the power of soccer.
  • High-profile sport figures, global leaders, business leaders, political figure, journalists, activists, philanthropists, actors, and entrepreneurs united by their commitment to the Diaspora World Cup mission to eradicate illiteracy around the world through the power of soccer. They serve as role models and spread the Diaspora World Cup vision and commitment of a world mobilized through soccer.
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Toronto – Burlington





Toronto is a city with a of history with soccer and one of the earliest soccer games was played in Toronto in 1859 between the St. George's Society and a team of Irishmen. Games were played in New Westminster in 1862 and in Victoria in 1865. The first game played under modern rules took place in Toronto in 1876, after which the Dominion Football Association, the first recorded football association outside the British Isles, was formed in Toronto in 1877 to foster competition between local sides. The first soccer book published in Canada was published in Toronto in March 1879.



As in other English-speaking nations outside the United Kingdom, association football has been traditionally overshadowed by a rival code of the game with explicitly local roots. As in Australia, where Australian Rules football took hold; and Ireland, where Gaelic Football is played; while in New Zealand rugby holds greater popularity and yet Canadian football usurped association football. In 1869, the founding of Hamilton Football Club, who played what would become Canadian football, helped make that sport the dominant football code in Canada by the dawn of the twentieth century. Despite the difference in popularity of their respective professional leagues, soccer overtook ice hockey in the 1980s and 1990s as the sport with the most registered players in the country according to Fifa and in 2008 there were 873,032 soccer players, compared to 584,679 registered hockey players in Canada in 2008-09.

The Destination
Blending warm sophistication with spectacular design, the Weston Park in York in the west of Toronto is a 7.4 hectare park on the east bank of the Humber River at Lawrence Avenue and Weston Road. This park features two ball diamonds including one with lights, a lit artificial turf soccer field, four lit tennis courts, a skateboard area, a basketball court, a splash pad and a children's playground. According to the Ontario Voice on Public Policy, the world Diaspora living in Canada has shaped the Canadian identity that include a lot of diversity. Many of those are now embracing the Diaspora World Cup for a good cause.



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